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Month: January 2017

Nancy Glazener. Literature in the Making: A History of U.S. Literary Culture in the Long Nineteenth Century

Nancy Glazener. Literature in the Making: A History of U.S. Literary Culture in the Long Nineteenth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. xii, 332p. ISBN 9780199390137. US $65.

Early in her engaging new book, Nancy Glazener describes literature as both a “collective invention” and an “institution” (3). In this way, she attempts to argue for its status as a construct – created collaboratively and refined over time – even as she suggests that literature also has a settled monolithic quality propped up by libraries, schools, publishing houses, and other large seemingly-static forces.

Gayle Garlock. Canadian Binders’ Tickets and Booksellers’ Labels

Gayle Garlock. Canadian Binders’ Tickets and Booksellers’ Labels. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2015. 158p., ill., CD. ISBN 9781584563372. US $95.00 (hardback).

At first glance, Gayle Garlock’s Canadian Binders’ Tickets and Booksellers’ Labels appears to be a slim book on a narrow topic. However, one is happily surprised to find the vast range of information contained in this work, not only on the topics specifically represented by the title, but on well-referenced aspects of the history of the book in Canada.

Beverly Lyon Clark. The Afterlife of Little Women

Beverly Lyon Clark. The Afterlife of “Little Women.” Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. x, 271p., ill. ISBN 9781421415581. US $44.95.

In this thoroughly researched and well-documented text, Clark explores the history of the reception of Little Women from its publication in 1868 to the present. In addition, she considers how critics and the public viewed Alcott herself – in a sense exploring Alcott’s own reception with children and adults, scholars and the general public, from her sudden celebrity due to the popularity of the book to her “reclamation” by feminist scholars in the twenty-first century.

Ardis Cameron. Unbuttoning America: A Biography of Peyton Place

Ardis Cameron. Unbuttoning America: A Biography of “Peyton Place.” Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2015. xiv, 223p., ill. ISBN 080145364X. US $24.95.

In this comprehensive analysis of Grace Metalious’s 1956 novel, its scandalous reception, and the movie and television show it spawned, Ardis Cameron establishes herself as the preeminent scholarly expert on Peyton Place. Cameron wrote the introduction to the Northeastern University Press 1999 reissue of the novel and has been the book’s greatest champion since.

Casey Brienza. Manga in America: Transnational Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics

Casey Brienza. Manga in America: Transnational Book Publishing and the Domestication of Japanese Comics. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016. xiii, 214p., ill. ISBN 9781472595874; 9781472595881. US $29.95 (paperback) / US $24.99 (EPUB eBook).

Throughout Manga in America, Casey Brienza makes a convincing case for the relevance of looking at manga as a case study in transnational publishing, bringing together contemporary topics for scholars in book publishing, comics publishing, and culture industries in general. Working primarily with qualitative information emerging from interviews with industry insiders, Brienza’s book presents an informative introduction followed by six topical chapters, a conclusion, a methodological appendix, and a helpful glossary.

Rebecca Rego Barry with a Foreword by Nicholas A. Basbanes. Rare Books Uncovered: True Stories of Fantastic Finds in Unlikely Places

Rebecca Rego Barry with a Foreword by Nicholas A. Basbanes. Rare Books Uncovered: True Stories of Fantastic Finds in Unlikely Places. Minneapolis, MN: Voyageur Press, 2015. 256p., ill. ISBN 9780760348611. US $25.00.

In Larry McMurtry’s novel Cadillac Jack, the title character makes the prescient observation about desirable rarities that “anything can be found anywhere.” A used-and-rare bookseller friend of mine is fond of saying that there are so many rare, collectible books in the world that the chances are very good that you will come across several in your lifetime; however, there are so many different kinds of books in the world that the chances are you will not recognize the desirable book as rare or collectible when you come across it.

Noelle Gallagher. Historical Literatures: Writing about the Past in England, 1660-1740

Noelle Gallagher. Historical Literatures: Writing about the Past in England, 1660-1740. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016. xx, 272 p., ill. IBSN 978071999243. GBP £16.99 (paperback).

Charting important territory in Restoration and early eighteenth-century literary studies, Noelle Gallagher presses the relationship between history and other forms and genres of writing invested in representing the past, particularly the recent past.

Mark Rose. Authors in Court: Scenes from the Theater of Copyright

Mark Rose. Authors in Court: Scenes from the Theater of Copyright. Cambridge, MA; London, England: Harvard University Press, 2016. xiv, 219 p. ill. ISBN 9780674048041. US $29.95 (hardback). With the recent litigation of Authors Guild v. Google in late 2015 and the much publicised discussions surrounding Fair Use and Permissions and the International James Joyce Foundation, it would be hard to argue against the opportune timing of Mark Rose’s new book, Authors in Court: Scenes from the Theater of Copyright,…

Roeland Harms, Joad Raymond, and Jeroen Salman (eds.). Not Dead Things: The Dissemination of Popular Print in England and Wales, Italy, and the Low Countries, 1500-1820

Roeland Harms, Joad Raymond, and Jeroen Salman (eds.). Not Dead Things: The Dissemination of Popular Print in England and Wales, Italy, and the Low Countries, 1500-1820. Leiden: Brill, 2013. xvii, 328 p., [8] p., ill. ISBN 9789004253056. €128.00 / US $165.00 (hardback).

This essay collection derives in part from a memorable conference, “Pedlars, Pamphlets and the Popular Press (1600-1850),” held at the University of Utrecht in 2010. It focuses on the book trade as a “series of dynamic processes” (3) including, crucially, the distribution networks which enabled books to move between their originators and readers.

Chloe Porter. Making and Unmaking in Early Modern English Drama: Spectators, Aesthetics and Incompletion

Chloe Porter. Making and Unmaking in Early Modern English Drama: Spectators, Aesthetics and Incompletion. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2013. viii, 230p., ill. ISBN 9780719084973. US $110.00 (hardcover).

In her intriguing new book, Chloe Porter adds to the growing body of scholarship that treats the theatrical making of early modern plays as a collaborative enterprise. Porter situates the production of early modern drama – as well as its concern with artistic processes of all kinds – in the context of a broader visual culture where the collaborative creation of art, especially via patronage, was the norm.