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Alexander S. Wilkinson and Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo, eds. Iberian Books Volumes II & III. Books Published in Spain, Portugal and the New World or Elsewhere in Spanish or Portuguese between 1601 and 1650

Alexander S. Wilkinson and Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo, eds. Iberian Books Volumes II & III. Books Published in Spain, Portugal and the New World or Elsewhere in Spanish or Portuguese between 1601 and 1650 / Libros Ibéricos Volúmenes II y III: Libros publicados en España, Portugal y el Nuevo Mundo o impresos en otros lugares en español o portugués entre 1601 y 1650. Vol. 1: A-E; Vol. 2: F-Z. Brill: Leiden, 2016. Vol. 1: xcii, 1246 p. ill.; Vol. 2: xliv, 2510 p.…

Cynthia Ellen Roman, ed. Hogarth’s Legacy

Cynthia Ellen Roman, ed. Hogarth’s Legacy. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2016.xl. 259 p. 108 ill. ISBN 9780300215618. USD 60.00 (hardcover). Cynthia Ellen Roman’s edition of collected essays on the legacy of the English engraver, printmaker, and painter William Hogarth (1697-1764) is a timely tribute to one of the most iconic figures of the eighteenth-century visual satire, 250 years after the artist’s death. The collection focuses for the first time on Hogarth’s afterlife in Britain and abroad by…

Stephan Füssel, ed. Gutenberg-Jahrbuch, no. 92

Stephan Füssel, ed. Gutenberg-Jahrbuch, no. 92. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2017. 288 p. ISBN 9783447108324. EUR 75.00.

Frustrating as the delayed arrival of this volume was, it had the effect of whetting my appetite all the more to read the contents. I will first discuss the contributions which caught my eye as closest to my own interests. A regular contributor, Marvin J. Heller, continues his survey of Hebrew printing in early modern Europe by focusing on the town of Verona, which had a thriving Jewish community, amounting to some nine hundred at the end of the eighteenth century. A feature of Jewish life there was the sporadic printing of Hebrew books from the late sixteenth to the mid seventeenth century, first by Francesco dalle Donne who issued a small number of Hebrew and Yiddish books from 1592 to 1595, and then by Francesco de’ Rossi between 1645 to 1652.

Lia Markey. Imagining the Americas in Medici Florence

Lia Markey. Imagining the Americas in Medici Florence. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2016. xvii, 241 p., ill. ISBN 9780271071152. $79.95 (hardcover).

The reader, upon opening this book, is greeted by a stunning array of 110 colour and black-and-white images, including many details, which exhibit the depth and breadth of primarily Florentine representations of the Americas during the first few decades of Euro-American contact. Organized into a series a nine case studies, each of which focuses on specific works of art and material culture that formed part of the collections created for or viewed by Cosimo de’ Medici’s sons (specifically from the onset of the ruler’s reign in 1537 to the end of his son’s reign in 1609), the book is framed by a brief introduction. The book thusly not only explores these artifacts originating from or made to represent the Americas, but it also meditates on the practices of collecting as well as the ways through which collections are encountered in this same cultural and historical moment.

Gerhard Holzer, Valerie Newby, Petra Svatek, and Georg Zotti, eds. A World of Innovation: Cartography in the Time of Gerhard Mercator

Gerhard Holzer, Valerie Newby, Petra Svatek, and Georg Zotti, eds. A World of Innovation: Cartography in the Time of Gerhard Mercator. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015. xvii, 261 p., ill. ISBN 9781443871532. £47.99 (hardcover).

The scholarship contained in this book was convened by the editors at a conference held in Vienna in 2012 in celebration of the 500th anniversary of Gerhard Mercator’s date of birth. The thirteen chapters of this edited collection are spread over four thematic sections, the most substantial of which houses five chapters that examine the Hapsburg Empire in light of this cartographer’s lifespan.

Konstantinos Staikos. The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515)

Konstantinos Staikos. The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515). Trans. Katerina Spathi. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2016. xv, 293 p., ill. ISBN 9781584563426. US$ 65.00 (hardcover).

The recent unveiling of Simon Fraser University’s online resource ALDUS @ SFU: The Wosk-McDonald Aldine Collection allows visitors to examine fully digitized versions of Latin, Greek, and Italian books printed by Manutius Aldus (1452-1515). A contemporary of Gutenberg, Manutius played a significant role in the development of early printing. Konstantinos Staikos’s new volume, The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515), provides a visually stunning account of Manutius’s Greek editions that should complement Simon Fraser University’s website by allowing readers a chance to see images from these editions that may otherwise be out of immediate grasp.

Andrew Hammond, ed. The Novel and Europe: Imagining the Continent in Post-1945 Fiction

Andrew Hammond, ed. The Novel and Europe: Imagining the Continent in Post-1945 Fiction. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. Palgrave Studies in Modern European Literature. xiv, 361 p. ISBN 9781137526267. US$ 99.99 (hardcover).

The title under review is a volume in the Palgrave Studies in Modern European Literature series, affiliated with the University of Kent’s Centre for Modern European Literature. This series broadly aims to promote new approaches to reading and studying European literature by interrogating traditional critical approaches to comparatively well-known European authors and works as well as through analyzing and exposing the work of lesser-known writers working in European and other contexts since the Second World War.

Paul Raphael Rooney and Anna Gasperini, eds. Media and Print Culture Consumption in Nineteenth-Century Britain: The Victorian Reading Experience

Paul Raphael Rooney and Anna Gasperini, eds. Media and Print Culture Consumption in Nineteenth-Century Britain: The Victorian Reading Experience. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. New Directions in Book History. 241 p. ISBN 9781137587602. U.K. £66.99.

Simply because the Internet exists, the opinions on a medieval-style fantasy novel series called A Song of Ice and Fire or on Game of Thrones (GoT) in the television adaptation are easily found. Today, in addition to hearing from professional critics on staff at The New Yorker, The Guardian, and The Metro papers, various GoT fans can share their pop culture thoughts on Reddit, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media social platforms, pop culture websites, and discussion forums.

Henry Ansgar Kelly. The Middle English Bible: A Reassessment

Henry Ansgar Kelly. The Middle English Bible: A Reassessment. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016. xiv, 349 p. ISBN 9780812248340. US$ 69.95 (hardcover and e-book).

In 135 pages of text and 18 technical appendices, Henry Ansgar Kelly reassesses the translations of the Middle English Bible to produce an interesting monograph on the subject. The translations he compares are primarily the Lollard or Wycliffite Bibles (pre-fifteenth century), which pre-date incunable vernacular bibles. Interestingly, Kelly devotes much of the slim text to scholarship about the history and translation of the Wycliffite Bible. He assesses pertinent scholarship from the fifteenth century to the present, paying considerable attention to contemporaneous commentators.

Brooke Conti. Confessions of Faith in Early Modern England

Brooke Conti. Confessions of Faith in Early Modern England. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. viii, 240p. ISBN 9780812245752. US$ 55.00 (hardback).

Literary criticism continues to be taken with the complex, dynamic nature of early modern religious belief. Such is the case with Brooke Conti’s Confessions of Faith in Early Modern England, which considers short bursts of religious self-confession amidst the political prose works of King James I, John Donne, John Milton, Thomas Browne, John Bunyan, and King James II. Conti defines these “confessions of faith” as “polemically inspired autobiographies that purport to lay bare their authors’ beliefs but that tend, instead, to complicate and obscure them” (2).