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Tag: bibliography

Marie Elena Korey, ed. A Long Way from the Armstrong Beer Parlour – A Life in Rare Books: Essays by Richard Landon

Richard Landon, ed. with an introduction by Marie Elena Korey. A Long Way from the Armstrong Beer Parlour – A Life in Rare Books: Essays by Richard Landon. New Castle, DE and Toronto, ON: Oak Knoll Press and The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, 2014. 440p., ill. ISBN 9781584563303. US$ 49.95 (hardback).

As Marie Elena Korey notes in the introduction to this volume, Richard Landon grew up in rural Armstrong, British Columbia, and intended to study agriculture at university, only to discover that his interests actually lay in the humanities. After his graduation from college in 1965, a year spent working in a serials position at the University of British Columbia Library led him to pursue a degree in library science, and not long after completion of that programme, in 1970, Landon made a trip to New York City to visit the Grolier Club and the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America.

Caroline Maniaque-Benton and Meredith Gaglio, eds. Whole Earth Field Guide

Caroline Maniaque-Benton and Meredith Gaglio, eds. Whole Earth Field Guide. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2016. xii, 107p., ill. ISBN 9780262529280. US $34.95.

The Whole Earth Field Guide is a heavily illustrated, welcome contribution to the study of the remarkable multiyear enterprise which began humbly in 1968. This book aims “to introduce the reader to the intellectual world to which the Catalog opened a door,” and it looks exclusively to the National Book Award-winning Last Whole Earth Catalog (1971) to do so (ix).

Konstantinos Staikos. The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515)

Konstantinos Staikos. The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515). Trans. Katerina Spathi. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2016. xv, 293 p., ill. ISBN 9781584563426. US$ 65.00 (hardcover).

The recent unveiling of Simon Fraser University’s online resource ALDUS @ SFU: The Wosk-McDonald Aldine Collection allows visitors to examine fully digitized versions of Latin, Greek, and Italian books printed by Manutius Aldus (1452-1515). A contemporary of Gutenberg, Manutius played a significant role in the development of early printing. Konstantinos Staikos’s new volume, The Greek Editions of Aldus Manutius and His Greek Collaborators (c. 1494-1515), provides a visually stunning account of Manutius’s Greek editions that should complement Simon Fraser University’s website by allowing readers a chance to see images from these editions that may otherwise be out of immediate grasp.

Women in Book History Bibliography

Women in Book History Bibliography. Texas A&M University: 2016. <www.womensbookhistory.org>

Women in Book History Bibliography is a very useful tool for researchers interested in the scholarship devoted to the topic. Compiled by Cait Coker and Kate Ozment, two doctoral students in English at Texas A&M University, it has grown from 165 entries at the time of the web site’s launch on May 2, 2016, to 588 entries as of November 11, 2016.

Eric Gardner. Black Print Unbound: The Christian Recorder, African American Literature, and Periodical Culture

Eric Gardner. Black Print Unbound: The Christian Recorder, African American Literature, and Periodical Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. 329p. ISBN 9780190237080. US$ 29.95.

With Black Print Unbound, Eric Gardner has significantly advanced the study of African American culture and history while at the same time giving a master class in working across the various methods of inquiry and styles of research gathered under the big tent of print culture studies. Black Print Unbound is a study of the Christian Recorder, the weekly newspaper of the AME Church, as a publication “conceived by African Americans, edited by African Americans, written primarily by African Americans, and largely distributed by African Americans to an almost completely African American audience” (4).

John Carter’s ABC for Book Collectors, revised and enlarged by Nicolas Barker and Simran Thadani

John Carter’s ABC for Book Collectors, revised and enlarged by Nicolas Barker and Simran Thadani, 9th edition. New Castle, DE: Oak Knoll Press, 2016. 264p., 32 illus. (22 colour and 10 halftones). ISBN 9781584563525. US $29.95 (hardcover).

John Carter’s ABC for Book Collectors is without question a book that all serious book historians must read and a book that almost everyone with a genuine interest in books should own. It typically sits nicely on our reference shelves with such staple volumes that remain in the affordable range for all book-aficionados and bibliophiles as Philip Gaskell’s A New Introduction to Bibliography (1972, latest 1995), Fredson Bowers’s Principles of Bibliographical Description (1949, latest 2012), and one or more generalist or specialist study, such as D. C. Greetham’s Textual Scholarship: An Introduction (1992) or David Pearson’s Provenance Research in Book History: A Handbook (1994). Probably, the very serious book historian will own more than one edition of the Carter, as early prints are to be had very easily at book fairs, even at a price agreeable to those of us “poor scholars” (Alan Thomas’s turn of phrase, 86) on a modest income.

Paul Valkema Blouw. Dutch Typography in the Sixteenth Century: The Collected Works of Paul Valkema Blouw

Paul Valkema Blouw. Dutch Typography in the Sixteenth Century: The Collected Works of Paul Valkema Blouw. Edited by Ton Croiset van Uchelen and Paul Dijstelberge. (Library of the Written Word 18; The Handpress World 12.) Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2013. xxii, 996p., ill. ISBN 9789004256545; ISSN 1874-834. US $353.00 (hardback).

“Bibliographical analysis can lead to results which range well beyond its original objective: the history of the book as a printed text and as the object of the book trade. […] It seems to me of some importance that this possibility should be more widely appreciated.” (113) With these words Paul Valkema Blouw (1916-2000), bibliographer, antiquarian book dealer and book historian, concluded a paper about a small Frisian chronicle in 1984. Working alone in the pre-digital age, using his meticulous analytical mind combined with a rare sensibility to the subtleties of sixteenth-century type design, he composed the Dutch national bibliography of books printed in the Northern Netherlands between 1540 and 1600.

G. Thomas Tanselle. Portraits & Reviews

G. Thomas Tanselle. Portraits & Reviews. Charlottesville: The Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia, 2015. 485p. ISBN 9781883631161. $55.00.

Many years ago, as I sat in my first bibliography class taught by Donald Krummel at the University of Illinois, I skimmed the semester’s assigned reading and a few familiar names caught my eye: Fredson Bowers, Philip Gaskell, D. F. McKenzie. However, another name really grabbed hold of my curiosity: G. Thomas Tanselle. Not from recognizing his name, but because of the sheer volume of articles listed on the syllabus.

David vander Meulen, ed. Studies in Bibliography: Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia 59

David vander Meulen, ed. Studies in Bibliography: Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia 59. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015. vi, 336p., ill. ISBN 9780813933016. US $70.00. Also available online at http://bsuva.org/wordpress/studies-in-bibliography/.

Studies in Bibliography returns after a seven-year hiatus with a full spectrum of essays, some bristling with the formulas and charts of traditional bibliography, and some grounded in newer book history methods.

Zachary Lesser. “Hamlet” after Q1: An Uncanny History of the Shakespearean Text

Zachary Lesser. “Hamlet” after Q1: An Uncanny History of the Shakespearean Text. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014.292 p., 27 ill. ISBN 9780812246612. US $59.95 / GBP £52.00 (hardcover).

Zachary Lesser begins Hamlet” after Q1: An Uncanny History of the Shakespearean Text with an account of Sir Henry Bunbury’s discovery of the volume containing the infamous “bad quarto” of Hamlet to introduce a story Lesser tells the reader will deal with “loss, destruction, and reconstruction” (1). Lesser explores the rather strange and indeed uncanny history of Q1 and its troubled relationship with the Q2 and 1623 Folio versions of the play.