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Tag: Chaucer

Mark Allen and Stephanie Amsel, eds. Annotated Chaucer Bibliography, 1997-2010

Mark Allen and Stephanie Amsel, eds. Annotated Chaucer Bibliography, 1997-2010. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2016. xx, 806p. ISBN 9780719096099. £75.00 (hardback).

In many ways, my review header would seem to contain everything you need to know about the Annotated Chaucer Bibliography. Mark Allen (the long-time bibliographer for the annual journal Studies in the Age of Chaucer [SAC]) and Stephanie Amsel (his worthy successor) continue the sequence of volumes compiled by a century’s worth of distinguished Chaucer bibliographers — Eleanor Prescott Hammond, Dudley D. Griffith, Willard E. Martin, Lorrayne Y. Baird, Hildegard Schnuttgen, and Bege K. Bowers.

Emily Steiner and Lynn Ransom, eds. Taxonomies of Knowledge: Information and Order in Medieval Manuscripts

Emily Steiner and Lynn Ransom, eds. Taxonomies of Knowledge: Information and Order in Medieval Manuscripts. Philadelphia: Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies / University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. x, 162 p., 18 colour plates, 9 b/w ill. ISBN 9780812247596. US $45.00; UK £29.50 (hardback).

This book assembles a short collection of essays broadly relating to the different ways in which knowledge in the medieval world was organised and classified in and by manuscripts and book-collecting culture. Starting life as papers presented at an annual Schoenberg symposium on manuscript studies at the University of Pennsylvania, the volume functions as something of a festschrift for the founder of Penn Libraries’ Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, the late Lawrence J. Schoenberg, and it offers six complementary approaches to how manuscript evidence may be used to provide insights on the ways in which literary, scientific, geographic, devotional, and hagiographic knowledge was categorised and interpreted in the later Middle Ages.

Guyda Armstrong. The English Boccaccio: A History in Books

Guyda Armstrong. The English Boccaccio: A History in Books. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 2013. xvi, 496p., with 16p. b&w plates. ISBN 9781442628779. CAD $42.95 (paperback).

Guyda Armstrong’s The English Boccaccio is a splendid example of what can be done with the biography of a text or, in this case, of a corpus of texts. Tracing the history of Boccaccio’s major and minor works as they have appeared in English, this book focuses on the material presentation of editions of those works and, in a series of case studies ranging from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries, uses them to illuminate the wonderful diversity of ways in which Boccaccio was received in English (and occasionally in and via other languages as well) over a period of some five hundred years.