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Tag: literacy

Margaret Mackey. One Child Reading: My Auto-Bibliography

Margaret Mackey. One Child Reading: My Auto-Bibliography. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2016. xvi, 567p., ill. ISBN 9781772120394. CAN$ 60.00.

One Child Reading opens with a striking black and white photograph of a young child intently immersed in an open book while stirring something in a pot on the stove. The child’s eyes are firmly on the page of the book, not on the hand wielding a wooden spoon. The text on the right-side page indicates that the child in the photo is the author. “All sighted readers will recognize the invisible dotted line that connects my eyes to the words and images on the page. That virtual line, that indefinable connection between abstract representations and the live imagination of an interpreter, is the subject of this book” (3).

Shawn Anthony Christian. The Harlem Renaissance and the Idea of a New Negro Reader

Shawn Anthony Christian. The Harlem Renaissance and the Idea of a New Negro Reader. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2016. iii, 140p. ISBN 9781625342010 (paper); 9781625342003 (hardcover). $US 25.95 (paper); $US 90.00 (hardcover).

The Harlem Renaissance and the Idea of a New Negro Reader argues that the idea of the reader was central to Harlem Renaissance discourse. African American commentators celebrated “close,” “engaged,” and “critical” reading (25, 37, 18) as the key to black autonomy and equality. By the 1910s, literacy was a widely shared value in the United States, a skill linked to moral, intellectual, and material success. The promises attached to literacy were especially attractive to marginalized readers, such as African Americans.

Arni Brownstone. War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation

Arni Brownstone. War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2015. xii, 143p., ill. ISBN 9781772120523. CAD 35.00

War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation builds from the premise that during much of the nineteenth century, pictographic paintings on tipi liners and story robes functioned as the closest equivalent to written records for the Indigenous peoples of the North American Great Plains. Thus, for scholars with an interest in the histories of authorship and reading that extend beyond print and script, Brownstone’s study will be of particular interest.

Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution.

Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution.

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto

21 June–30 September, 2016.

F8170

Zhou Ruizhuang 周瑞庄 (1930– ). A Lifetime of Revolution, a Lifetime of Studying the Works of Chairman Mao (干一辈子革命, 读一辈子毛主席书). Shanghai: Shanghai People’s Fine Arts Publishing House, January 1966 (Seventh Printing).

The exhibition Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution, on display at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library from 21 June to 30 September 2016, curated by University of Toronto Associate Professor of Chinese & East Asian Art Jennifer Purtle and Elizabeth Ridolfo, Special Project Librarian of the Thomas Fisher Library, accompanied by a lush, colour catalogue, with descriptions of 50 of the unprecedented 217 objects, is well-timed and wide-ranging, a glorious celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966–1969), and a testament to the variety of books, posters, audio recordings, and objects generously donated to the University by Mark Gayn (1909–1981) and his wife Susan (b. 1921).

Wendy Wall. Recipes for Thought: Knowledge and Taste in the Early Modern English Kitchen

Wendy Wall. Recipes for Thought: Knowledge and Taste in the Early Modern English Kitchen. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016. xii, 312p., black and white ill. ISBN 9780812247589. US $69.95 (hardcover).

Umberto Boccioni’s Development of a Bottle in Space takes that simple, domestic form and explodes it geometrically into a complex structure quite unlike a bottle, yet derived from it. In Recipes for Thought: Knowledge and Taste in the Early Modern English Kitchen, Wendy Wall does something very like this for early modern English recipes, expanding these domestic artifacts into every implication of their structure and context.

Kate Loveman. Samuel Pepys and His Books: Reading, Newsgathering, and Sociability, 1660-1703

Kate Loveman. Samuel Pepys and His Books: Reading, Newsgathering, and Sociability, 1660-1703. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. xviii, 318p., ill. ISBN 9780198732686. £60 (hardback).

The main title of Kate Loveman’s book suggests that it must surely be another study of Samuel Pepys’s personal collection, resting today in his own bookcases at the Pepys Library at Magdalene College in Cambridge. Not at all; it’s the subtitle that tells us what Loveman is really interested in: the information network within which Pepys’s enthusiastic book-collecting and reading took place, and his use of his reading to rise in status from son of a London tailor to Secretary of the Admiralty.