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Tag: pamphlets

Lori Merish. Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States

Lori Merish. Archives of Labor: Working-Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States. Durham: Duke University Press, 2017. 328p. ISBN 9780822363224. US$ 26.95.

Lori Merish’s Archives of Labor: Working Class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States is an ambitious work that recovers texts by and about women, labor, and working-class experience. Merish examines texts that consider a diversity of women, including “Lowell mill women, African American ‘free laborers,’ Mexicana mission workers, urban seamstresses, and prostitutes” (10). This book both performs the work of recovering texts left out of literary history and analyzing the subject positions of the diverse women represented in them.

Flickering of the Flame: Print and the Reformation

Frontispiece of Martin Luther, De Captivitate Babylonica ecclesiae [Argentorati: Ioannis Schotti], 1520.

Flickering of the Flame: Print and the Reformation

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto

25 September–20 December 2017

Flickering of the Flame: Print and the Reformation is the fourth exhibition and catalogue that the Reverend Doctor P. J. Carefoote has prepared for the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library of the University of Toronto, and it is his second of 2017, following directly after his Struggle and Story: Canada in Print (20 March through 9 September; review here). His previous works include Nihil Obstat: An exhibition of banned, censored & challenged books in the West 1491–2000 (2005), adapted into the monograph Forbidden fruit: Banned, censored, and challenged books from Dante to Harry Potter (2007) and Calvin by the Book: A literary commemoration of the 500th Anniversary of the Birth of John Calvin (2009).

Anna Bayman, Thomas Dekker and the Culture of Pamphleteering in Early Modern London

Anna Bayman. Thomas Dekker and the Culture of Pamphleteering in Early Modern London. Farnham, U.K.: Ashgate, 2014. viii, 160 p. ISBN 9780754661733. £65.00 (hardcover).

When the dramatist and pamphleteer Thomas Dekker wanted to take the temperature of London’s Jacobean book trade, he had the steeple of St Paul’s Cathedral itself survey the activities conducted below in its churchyard: “at one time, in one and the same ranke, yea, foote by foote, and elbow by elbow, shall you see walking, the Knight, the Gull, the Gallant, the upstart, the Gentleman, the Clowne, the Captaine, the Appel-squire, the Lawyer, the Usurer, the Citizen … the Scholler, the Begger, the Doctor, the Ideot, the Ruffian, the Cheater, the Puritan, the Cut throat … the Law-man, the True-man, and the Thiefe, of all trades and professions some, and of all Countreys some.” While the building itself was aghast at the heedless pursuit of economic interests, the promiscuous mixing of social classes and nationalities taking place in its environs, the pamphlet in which this extravagant prosopopoeia first saw print, Dekker’s Dead Tearm (1608), drew its lifeblood from such eclectic company.

Catherine Pickett. Bibliography of the East India Company: Books, Pamphlets and Other Material Printed Between 1600 and 1785

Catherine Pickett. Bibliography of the East India Company: Books, Pamphlets and Other Material Printed Between 1600 and 1785. London: The British Library, 2011. xvi, 304 p. ISBN 9780712358446. £50.00 (hardback).

The product of several decades of painstaking research, this magnificent bibliography contains details of over 1500 printed works relating to the East India Company, between its formation in 1600 and 1785, when the passing of Pitt’s India Act (1784) bought the organisation more firmly under Parliamentary control. This comprehensive, detailed and informative collection is of immense value, both as a reference tool and as an important scholarly work in its own right, and is sure to prove a boon to those whose research and teaching interests pertain to commercial and colonial expansion in India in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.