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Tag: recipes

Megan J. Elias. Food on the Page: Cookbooks and American Culture. Keith Stavely and Kathleen Fitzgerald. United Tastes: The Making of the First American Cookbook.

 

Megan J. Elias. Food on the Page: Cookbooks and American Culture. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. 296p. ISBN 9780812249170. US$ 34.95.

Keith Stavely and Kathleen Fitzgerald. United Tastes: The Making of the First American Cookbook. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2017. 351p., ill. ISBN 9781625343222. US$ 32.95.

Cookbooks have always been vital sources for food studies scholars, because they presumably document what foods people have eaten and how they have prepared them. In these two engrossing studies, researchers move beyond recipes to investigate how cookbooks function as crucial national texts in the United States and as fruitful topics of print culture research.

Steven W. May and Arthur F. Marotti, eds. Ink, Stink Bait, Revenge, and Queen Elizabeth: A Yorkshire Yeoman’s Household Book

Steven W. May and Arthur F. Marotti, eds. Ink, Stink Bait, Revenge, and Queen Elizabeth: A Yorkshire Yeoman’s Household Book. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2014. xii, 272p., ill. ISBN 9780801456565. £16.47 / US $24.95 (paperback).

The focus of this book is the manuscript household miscellany of a literate Yorkshire gentleman, recently uncovered in the British Library (Add. MS 82370). The text features several hands, but was predominantly compiled by one John Hanson of Rastrick, Yorkshire (1517–1599), most likely in the early 1590s, and highlights a broad range of interests from local feuds over land, poems about events of national and international significance (like the Spanish Armada), and recipes for common household goods such as ink, fish bait and sealing wax.