Skip to content

Month: December 2016

Sari Edelstein. Between the Novel and the News: The Emergence of American Women’s Writing

Sari Edelstein. Between the Novel and the News: The Emergence of American Women’s Writing. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2014. 226p., 7 ill. ISBN 9780813935904. US $29.50.

Sari Edelstein’s Between the Novel and the News offers a bold corrective. While scholars and teachers have often connected male realist writers to journalism – the opening of Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham in which the eponymous character is being interviewed for a newspaper series is a quintessentially realist moment – critics have not given similar attention to how women writers in the long nineteenth century struggled to use and counter journalistic depictions of women and journalistic modes of narration. As Edelstein writes, “women writers have long regarded the press an ideological problem whose social and political influence had serious repercussions for lived experience” (148).

Carl Dair. Epistles to the Torontonians, with Articles from Canadian Printer and Publisher

Carl Dair. Epistles to the Torontonians, with Articles from Canadian Printer and Publisher. William Ross, Introduction, and Rod McDonald, Notes. Toronto and New Castle, Delaware: Coach House Press with Sheridan College and Oak Knoll Press, 2015. 127p. ISBN 9781584563396. US $75.00.

There is something magical about discovering old letters. Whether it be in the attic or the archive, reading old letters provides a personal insight into the lives of both the sender and receiver that stands apart both from histories of their lives and the more self-conscious writings of autobiographies and diaries. Through letters we can eavesdrop on the past.

Epistles to the Torontonians captures the conversations that Canadian typographer Carl Dair (1912–1967), and his wife Edith, had with other members of the Toronto typographical community during 1956–57.

Arni Brownstone. War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation

Arni Brownstone. War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press, 2015. xii, 143p., ill. ISBN 9781772120523. CAD 35.00

War Paintings of the Tsuu T’ina Nation builds from the premise that during much of the nineteenth century, pictographic paintings on tipi liners and story robes functioned as the closest equivalent to written records for the Indigenous peoples of the North American Great Plains. Thus, for scholars with an interest in the histories of authorship and reading that extend beyond print and script, Brownstone’s study will be of particular interest.

Nicole N. Aljoe and Ian Finseth, eds. Journeys of the Slave Narrative in the Early Americas

Nicole N. Aljoe and Ian Finseth, eds. Journeys of the Slave Narrative in the Early Americas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2014. 256p. ISBN 9780813936383. US $29.50 (paperback and ebook); US $59.50 (hardback).

“Books … have life spans and life chances… that correlate positively with the race of the author” argues Joanna Brooks in her brilliant essay, “The Unfortunates: What the Life Spans of Early Black Books Tell Us about Book History.” Brooks is particularly interested in “those substantial, more pricey books of more than forty-eight pages.” Still, we can cautiously extend her insight to other racialized material texts, which face some of the same existential challenges, from “being written, published, sold, bought, read, reprinted, [and] circulated” in the first place to being “collected and preserved” over time.

Jaime Harker and Cecilia Konchar Farr, eds. This Book Is an Action: Feminist Print Culture and Activist Aesthetics

Jaime Harker and Cecilia Konchar Farr, eds. This Book Is an Action: Feminist Print Culture and Activist Aesthetics. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2016. ix, 250p. ISBN 9780252081347. US $28.00 (paperback).

The 11 essays assembled by co-editors Jaime Harker (University of Mississippi) and Cecilia Konchar Farr (St. Catherine University) in This Book Is an Action: Feminist Print Culture and Activist Aesthetics affirm the significance of print culture as a form of activism within second-wave feminism. Viewing print as a revolutionary form of self-expression, feminists built a communications network – authors, illustrators, typesetters, editors, publishers, distributors, bookstore owners, reviewers, and readers – dedicated to working collaboratively to produce and promote works by, for, and about women.

Mindful Hands. I capolavori miniati della fondazione Giorgio Cini

Mindful Hands. I capolavori miniati della fondazione Giorgio Cini

[Illuminated masterpieces from the Giorgio Cini foundation]

Curated by Alessandro Martoni, Massimo Medica, Federica Toniolo.

Cini Foundation,Venice

September 17, 2016-January 8, 2017

miniature-evento-680x297

The exhibition showcases a selection of illuminated manuscripts (and fragments from them, at times recomposed in proto-collages) from the collection, which Vittorio Cini bought between 1939 and 1940 from the Libreria Antiquaria Hoepli founded in Milan in 1881. The art-historical value of the collection has received the insightful attention of several art historians, among them Piero Toesca, and is highlighted in the sections of the exhibition reconstructing the activity of several schools and workshops in the Italian peninsula from the 12th to the 16th century.

Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution.

Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution.

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto

21 June–30 September, 2016.

F8170

Zhou Ruizhuang 周瑞庄 (1930– ). A Lifetime of Revolution, a Lifetime of Studying the Works of Chairman Mao (干一辈子革命, 读一辈子毛主席书). Shanghai: Shanghai People’s Fine Arts Publishing House, January 1966 (Seventh Printing).

The exhibition Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China’s Cultural Revolution, on display at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library from 21 June to 30 September 2016, curated by University of Toronto Associate Professor of Chinese & East Asian Art Jennifer Purtle and Elizabeth Ridolfo, Special Project Librarian of the Thomas Fisher Library, accompanied by a lush, colour catalogue, with descriptions of 50 of the unprecedented 217 objects, is well-timed and wide-ranging, a glorious celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966–1969), and a testament to the variety of books, posters, audio recordings, and objects generously donated to the University by Mark Gayn (1909–1981) and his wife Susan (b. 1921).