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Month: January 2017

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines. Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript

Chet Van Duzer and Ilya Dines. Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015. ix, 251 p., ill. ISBN 9789004304536. €135.00 (hardcover).

This book focuses on a manuscript in the Huntington Library, located in San Marino, California (Ms HM 83), an unstudied fifteenth-century German codex that contains not only the largest but also the most curious collection of mappaemundi in any one document.

Irena R. Makaryk and Virlana Tkacz, eds. Modernism in Kyiv: Jubilant Experimentation

Irena R. Makaryk and Virlana Tkacz, eds. Modernism in Kyiv: Jubilant Experimentation. Toronto, Buffalo, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2015 [reprint]. xxi, 666 p., ill. ISBN 9781442629004. CAD $49.95 (paperback).

The long-overdue edited volume Modernism in Kyiv firmly places the Ukrainian capital on the cultural map of the world and situates it on the same level as other centres of the avant-garde production such as Paris, Vienna, London, New York, and Moscow. Hitherto categorized under the label of “Soviet” or “Russian,” Kyiv’s contribution to the cultural front at the beginning of the twentieth century was visible only to the specialists in the field, but this meticulously researched and carefully edited volume possesses the power of a manifesto ready to proclaim it to a wider audience.

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum. Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum. Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. xvi, 344 p., 22 halftones. ISBN 9780674417076. USA $29.95 (hardcover).

The appeal for any reader of this work is Matthew Kirschenbaum’s artful blend of technological history and literary history. Kirschenbaum’s background in English literature along with his work in the digital humanities and print history serve him well with this approach. The work is organized into ten chapters that center on a particular topic related to the development of word processing, covering the span from the mid-twentieth century to today.